Stress

What Are Artifacts of Compromise?

The state of matter we call life is marked by a continual flow of energy through the cell. The relationship between the cell, its internal environment, and its external environment, is essential for promoting positive development as well as healing and recovery. When the body undergoes stress—whether mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, or toxic—this can lead(…)

Redefining the Word “Stress”

People often talk about “holiday stress.” But what does that really mean? Are the holidays stressful in and of themselves? Why do tasks like holiday shopping, decorating, cooking, and wrapping presents stress some people out, while making others feel joyful and cheery? These two very different responses to so-called “stressful” events help to highlight the(…)

Psychosocial Stress and the Biochemical State

You probably already know that your cognitive and emotional states affect your physical health and the way your body functions (e.g., psychosocial stress can have a negative impact on heart health). But did you know that the converse is also true? Chemicals taken in from your environment as well as produced within your cells affect(…)

The Five Categories of Stress

Stress is usually thought of as psychological. But there are many different types, which can be divided into the five categories of stress: mental, physical, emotional, nutritional, and toxic. I have developed these general categories to help my clients better understand the various stressors in their lives. The body undergoes stress anytime it encounters a challenge(…)

Tips for Endurance Training

Endurance athletics is a popular sport and important pastime. But endurance training can be hard on your body without good nutrition, sleep, and monitoring.1-2 Do you enjoy long, moderately-paced activities like long-distance racing, marathon running, or cross-country skiing? Follow these nine tips for safe and effective endurance training, designed specifically for endurance athletes. Nine Tips(…)

Chronic Stress Part II: How does it happen to me?

In the last post on Chronic Stress I outlined the symptoms and causes of chronic stress syndrome. I described it as a state represented by two primary features. 1) a constant, ongoing, or routine compromise of function and 2) frequently being brought into a stress state by challenges that should be easily met. I also(…)